Fishing in Enontekiö

Enontekiö is a year-round fisherman's paradise whether you are in search of salmon or grayling in rivers like the Könkämäeno or Lätäseno or whitefish and brown trout in the large accessible lakes like Lake Pöyrisjärvi or in one of the many high remote fell lakes. Ice fishing, an everyman's right (www.ymparisto.fi), can be carried out without a permit and is very popular on Lake Ounasjärvi and Muotkajärvi.

During summer, fishing destinations near the village of Hetta include the Rivers Ounasjoki and Närpistöjoki. If you like lure fishing in boat, you can rent a boat from one of the local enterprises and try your luck at Lake Ounasjärvi. All 18-64 -year-olds must pay the national fishing management fee For lure fishing you should buy the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry lure fishing fee for the Province of Lapland.

Every fisher also needs a Hetta shareholder association permit, which can be bought from private tourist services. If you are planning on hiking further into the wilderness you should get the Enontekiö fishing area permit 1551. Fishing is forbidden in most parts of Pallas-Yllästunturi National Park.

Angling and ice fishing are Everyman’s Rights in all but flowing waters in the wilderness area. To fish in the wilderness areas you must pay an annual fishing management fee and buy fishing permit 1551 for Enontekiö.

If you have a provincial lure fishing permit, you can fish in the wilderness area’s lakes.

Permits can be bought from Metsähallitus netstore, at Skierri, Fell-Lapland Nature Centre, at other Metsähallitus customer service points and at local tourist enterprises.

The River Pöyrisjoki and several other rivers in the wilderness area are ideal for fly and lure fishing. Common catches from the river include the Whitefish (Goregonus lavaretus), Pike (Esox lucius), Perch (Perca fluviatilis) and Burbot (Lota lota), as well as, the Grayling (Thymallus thymallus) and Trout (Salmo trutta). These same species can be found in Lake Pöyrisjärvi. The lake’s dominant species is the Whitefish, which can weigh from 200 to 300 grams per fish.

Pallas-Yllästunturi National Park area has a number of waters in which fishing is prohibited or restricted. National Park or in the immediate vicinity is also the recreational fishing waters that require a recreational fishing license. The National Park tourism entrepreneur's guide (julkaisut.metsa.fi) has all the necessary information on fishing in the national park.

Recreation Fishing licenses Aakenus Holy Lake gets Kellokas Visitor Centre and Lure fishing Pallas Lake Pallas Visitor Centre, Raattama trade, Tel: (016) 537 325. Pallas Lake can also rent a boat from private entrepreneurs.

Forest Board of Directors erälupien online store can be purchased lure fishing and recreational fishing permits national park surrounding state-owned waters. Aakenus the Holy Lake (permit no 2525) you can buy a 3-hour and day permits to a mobile phone.

The sacred lake there is a signal, which can be found in the instructions and phone numbers to obtain permission. Private waters are fishing and owners of care and permits need to figure out järvikohtaisesti.

Hetta's Ice-Fishing Week: While the rest of Finland prepares for the coming summer, in Enontekiö we enjoy the best ice fishing season. The classic Enontekiö ice fishing competition is held at the end of April or start of May each week. The program for the Enontekiö ice fishing competition can be found here.

Each year thousands of people take part in the infamous ice fishing competition known as 'Only Two Fish' in Kilpisjärvi. Prizes are pretty big and catching the fish such a low probability that some just pay entry so as to get into the prize draw.

At the beginning of August there is also a Fly Fishing Contest organised in Karesuvanto.


General Information about Recreational Fishing in Finland
Permits
Closed Areas and Restrictions
Minimum sizes
Closed seasons

General Information about Recreational Fishing in Finland

Recreational fishing is the most important nature activity for Finns. About 40 per cent of the Finnish population, more than 2 million people, take part in fishing events at least once a year. Today leisure-time fishing is for the most part a recreation, instead of being based on the household needs. Fishing with various kinds of rods has become increasingly common.

Metsähallitus has 54 fishing destinations, where you can fish with a separate recreational fishing licence. With the Metsähallitus lure fishing licence you can fish with a fly or a lure on state waters anywhere in the country. To fish with nets, traps or other static fishing devices on state waters, you need a trap fishing licence. Metsähallitus also has several crayfishing locations in different parts of Finland.

The catch of recreational fishing accounts for about a third of the total catch of fish in Finland, and in the inland waters its share in the catch is almost 90 per cent. Free time fishing provides a significant share of the fish used in the Finnish households.

The annual catch of recreational fishing totals about 50 million kg, and almost half of this is caught by nets. In quantitative terms the most important species of fish are perch, pike and roach.

Recreational fishing is mainly concentrated in areas close to major population centres and to the lake district, where most of the holiday homes are located.

When fishing in Finland both Finns and foreigners alike have to buy fishing licences and pay pure-fishing fees. If, however, you only inted to ice fish or angle with hook and line there is no need to pay anything, because this is covered by public right of access.


Permits

Finland applies a fishing management fee system, whish is based on the Fishing Act. In most cases the fishing management fee must be paid, in addition to the appropriate licence. The need for a licence depends on the type of fishing and the age of the fisher. Permits for Enontekiö can be bought from the Fell-Lapland Nature Centre, tourist enterprises in Hetta Näkkälä, Palojärvi and at Kalmakaltio on the north-side of the village of Nunnanen.

Angling, jigging and lure fishing by means of the provincial lure fishing licence are so-called general fishing rights. However, there are certain restrictions on these types of fishing as well, for example, there are a number of closed areas where these may not be practised.

Finding information on the closed areas and fishing restrictions is often difficult, which may be a problem for fishers. In addition to the fishing authorities fishing may be restricted by e.g. the fishing districts and regional environment centres under the Nature Conservation Act.

Angling, Jigging and Ice-fishing
Angling, jigging and ice-fishing are included in the "everymans' rights", or the right of public access, which means that no licence is needed for practising these in a way set down in the Fishing Act.

In angling the rod or line is in the fisher's hand or within his or her reach, the rod has no reel which could be used for casting, and no jig, plug, spinner, surface lure, fly or other artificial lure is used. In practice this means angling with a natural bait, such as worm or fish.

If a spinning rod with a reel is used, the provincial lure fishing fee must be paid or a permission must be obtained from the owner of the fishing right.

In jigging the fisher uses a jig attached to a line which is moved up and down, either holding the line in the hand or by using a short rod which cannot be used for casting. Jigging can be practiced in both summer and winter (ice-fishing).

If the rod can be used for casting, the provincial lure fishing fee must be paid or a permission must be obtained from the owner of the fishing right.

Angling and jigging are prohibited in rapids and currents of waters rich in salmon and whitefish and water areas where fishing is prohibited under some other provision.

Other Fishing and Craw-Fishing
For other forms of fishing, such as fishing with nets, traps or seines as well as trolling, the permission of the owner of the water areas is always required independent of the age of the fisher. This also applies to cray-fishing. In public sea areas no licence of permission is required for recreational fishing and fishing for household use. Fishers who are 18 to 65 years of age must pay the fishing management fee.

Licences for fishing with nets or traps are mainly sold by the owners of the water area or their representatives. Many towns and municipalities also sell fishing licences for their waters.

Assisting persons such as rowers do not need a licence as long as they do not handle the fishing gear or catch during fishing.

Fishing Management Fee
Fishing management fee is a tax-like fee payable to the State if a person between 18 and 64 years of age practises fishing other than angling or jigging. The fee must also be paid when fishing in one's own waters.

Fishing management fee need not be paid for assisting persons (such as rowers) who do not handle the fishing gear during fishing.

Fishing management fee need not be paid for fishing in Åland.

Payment is made to bank account FI47 5000 0121 5028 42 . The recipient is the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry.

Fishing management fee may be paid for a calendar year or seven days.

The fee for the calendar year is 24 euros and it is valid until 31 December. The seven-day fee is 7 euros and it is valid for seven days from the date of payment or other date given in the receipt.

Fishing management fee is personal and it must be paid before fishing is started. The fisher must have proof of the payment and, if requested, present this to an authority or other person who supervises fishing. The proof may be a receipt, fishing card or bank statement.

About a third of the funds collected as fishing management fees are used directly for the management of fish populations, while certain other activities funded from these promote the population management indirectly. Today these funds are being used for increasingly diverse purposes, including support for the activity of fisheries organisations and fishing districts. However, the funds may not be used to support the national fisheries administration.

Lure Management Fee
Provincial lure fishing fee gives a general right for fishing within a certain province with one rod, reel and lure. In trolling a weight may also be used. Provincial lure fishing fee can be paid to more than one province.

The number of rods allowed cannot be increased by paying the fee several times to one province.

Provincial lure fishing fee can be paid to the following bank accounts:

Province of Lapland
The provincial lure fishing fee is 31 euros for a calendar year and 7 euros for the seven-day period. The seven-day period may start from the date of payment or date given in the receipt. The fishing management fee must also be paid.

Persons under 18 or over 64 years of age may practise lure fishing free of charge.

Provincial lure fishing fee is personal and it must be paid before fishing is started. A receipt, fishing card and bank statement are accepted as proof of payment. If requested, the proof of payment must be presented to an authority or other person supervising fishing.

An authority may prohibit lure fishing in a certain area. For example, the Employment and Economic Development Centre may issue a prohibition on lure fishing under section 11 of the Fishing Act. Information on the closed and restricted areas is available in the map service and at the Fisheries Units of the Employment and Economic Development Centres.

Fishing may also be prohibited under other law or regulations.

Provincial lure fishing fee does not allow fishing in:
- rapids and currents of salmon and whitefish waters
- water areas where fishing is prohibited under other provisions (e.g. prohibition of lure fishing issued by the Employment and Economic Development Centre under section 11 of the Fishing Act)
- close to inhabited shores where it may cause unnecessary disturbance
- less than 50 metres from a net, fyke or other fixed trap marked with a flag
- close to shore areas belonging to the Defence Forces
- certain harbour areas and navigation routes
- national parks and nature conservation areas established under the Nature Conservation Act (there may be exceptions to these)

Each year about 75,000 annual lure fishing licences and over 30,000 seven-day licences are purchased in Finland. The funds are returned to the owners of fishing waters after the costs due to the collection and allocation have been deducted. The owners of fishing waters use some of the funds for the management of fish populations.


Closed Areas and Restrictions

Angling, jigging and lure fishing by means of the provincial lure fishing licence are so-called general fishing rights. However, there are certain restrictions on these types of fishing as well, for example, there are a number of closed areas where these may not be practised.

Finding information on the closed areas and fishing restrictions is often difficult, which may be a problem for fishers. In addition to the fishing authorities fishing may be restricted by e.g. the fishing districts and regional environment centres under the Nature Conservation Act.

Closed areas
Fishing districts may set up closed area for no more than ten years in water areas where valuable fish species live, spawn or wander. The decision on the closed area defines when and how the fishing is restricted in the area.

A decision on a closed area may also restrict the so-called general fishing right, i.e. angling, jigging and lure fishing.

Decisions on closed areas are notified on municipal notice boards and the Official Journal. Many fishing districts also have web pages which also give information on closed areas.

Rapids and currents of waters rich in salmon and whitefish
According to the Fishing Act, angling, jigging and lure fishing based on the general fishing right are prohibited in rapids and currents of waters rich in salmon and whitefish.

According to the Fishing Act, these are waters used by these species as rising or wandering routes or where large numbers of them have been stocked. Salmon species include sea trout, lake trout, brown trout and rainbow trout.

If necessary, the Employment and Economic Development Centre decides whether a water body is regarded as rich in salmon or whitefish, and they keep a list of such waters in their territory. The lists are also available in the map service on closed areas for fishing on the web pages of the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry.

Nature conservation areas
Fishing may be restricted in nature conservation areas under the Nature Conservation Act. It may be difficult for fishers to know whether or not a certain type of fishing is allowed in a certain nature conservation area.

Fishing restrictions in nature conservation areas are written down in the decision of the environment centre, which is available only in its archives.

Other restrictions
The National Defence Forces have protected areas where movement or general fishing rights as such are not restricted. However, movement and fishing may be restricted in certain marked military sites. Further information on protected areas is available here.

Fishing is restricted in fish routes and within one hundred metres up or down from these or constructions intended to ensure the passage of fish. The fishing district may also prohibit fishing further down from the dam, in the basin above the dam, and in artificial lakes or artificial basins.

The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry may prohibit a certain type of trap or fishing in a certain water area for a fixed period if this is necessary for protecting a threatened animal population. This has been done, for example, to protect the Saimaa seal, but the decision does not restrict the general fishing right.

Angling, jigging or lure fishing may not be practised less than 50m from a clearly marked trap or so close to an inhabited shore that they may cause disturbance.


Minimum sizes

Minimum size sets the lowest limit for fish that may be caught. The length is measured from the tip of the jaw to the tip of the tail fin. The minimum sizes are laid down in the Fishing Decree.

Minimum size for sea trout and lake salmon is 60cm. Minimum size for lake trout is 60 cm in areas south of (67º00'N) latitude and 50 cm in areas north of the same latitude. Latitude (67º00'N) is situated c. 50 km north of polar circle. Minimum size for grayling is 35 cm areas south of (67º00'N) latitude and 30 cm in areas north of the same latitude.

Minimum size for sea salmon is 60cm (50cm in Bothnian bay), arctic charr in lake Inari 40cm and pikeperch 37cm.

In certain water areas the fishing districts may set a minimum size to other species (or crayfish) or set a limit which is higher than that laid down in the Fishing Decree.


Closed seasons

During the closed season the catching of a certain fish or crayfish species is prohibited. This means that no trap used for catching the species concerned or particularly suited for this may be kept in the water. Fish or crayfish which may not be caught during the closed season must be released should they get caught in a trap.

Sea salmon, lake salmon, sea trout, lake trout, brown trout: in rivers, brooks, rapids and currents in September, October and November, except by rod or trolling in the first ten days of September and after November 15

Arctic charr In Vuoksi watercourse: Arctic Charr is strictly protected, so fishing for this species is not allowed.

Grayling: in April and May, except in municipalities of Enontekiö, Inari and Utsjoki, where fishing by rod and trolling is allowed

River lamprey: from the beginning of April until the 15th of August

Crayfish and signal crayfish: from the beginning of November until 12 noon of July 21st